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Louisville Chief Talks JCPS Proposal for School Safety Officers

It’s not perfect, but it’s fair. That’s how a Louisville community leader describes Jefferson County Public School’s proposal that could put school safety officers into schools in the fall. . The SSOs will be trained police officers, but employed by the district and will report directly to the Director of Security and Investigations. They would be assigned to geographic areas spanning multiple schools and they would not be inside the school, but in a patrol car. In addition to the standard 40 hours of training per year, the district will require a total of 100 hours, this training includes implicit bias training and de-escalation. “I think it shows the district understands how serious this is and what can go wrong if you don’t have the proper training,” said Sadiqa Reynolds, president and CEO of the Louisville Urban League. . and also a JCPS parent. “I’m not saying the plan is perfect, I’m not saying it’s the plan I would have come up with, but I think it strikes the right balance,” Reynolds said. She says she would have liked to see more mental health resources for students, but applauds the plan to place safety administrators in every middle school and high school. They would report to the school principal and their main purpose would be to connect with the students. “I like the idea of ​​these school security guards actually being in the building getting to know the students and understanding what the issues are,” Reynolds says. The SSOs would not be responsible for student discipline, but they do have the power to make arrests. Reynolds says that while the planned $4-5 million investment won’t make everyone happy, for her; it’s worth seeing how it can play out. “It’s not going to be perfect; and because we’re imperfect people, we’re not going to achieve perfection, but what we have to do is the best we can do with the tools we have,” he said. Reynolds said. The JCP’s policy committee will meet next week to discuss the hiring process and other details. A finalized plan is expected to be presented to the school board by the end of the month.

It’s not perfect, but it’s fair.

That’s how a Louisville community leader describes Jefferson County Public School’s proposal that could put school safety officers into schools in the fall.

On Wednesday, the JCPS Policy Committee met to further discuss the proposed plan which includes adding School Safety Officers and School Safety Administrators.

The SSOs will be trained police officers, but employed by the district and will report directly to the Director of Security and Investigations.

They would be assigned to geographic areas spanning multiple schools and they would not be inside the school, but rather in a patrol car.

In addition to the standard 40 hours of training per year, the district will require a total of 100 hours, with that training including training in implicit bias and de-escalation.

“I think it shows the district understands how serious this is and what can go wrong if you don’t have the proper training,” said Sadiqa Reynolds, president and CEO of the Louisville Urban League. and also a parent of the JCPS.

“I’m not saying the plan is perfect, I’m not saying it’s the plan I would have come up with, but I think it strikes the right balance,” Reynolds said.

She says she would have liked to see more mental health resources for students, but applauds the plan to place safety administrators in every middle school and high school.

They would report to the school principal and their main purpose would be to connect with the students.

“I like the idea of ​​having these school safety officers who are actually in the building getting to know the students and understanding what the issues are,” Reynolds said.

The SSOs would not be responsible for student discipline, but they do have the power to make arrests. Reynolds says that while the planned $4-5 million investment won’t make everyone happy, for her; it is worth seeing how this can unfold.

“It’s not going to be perfect; and because we’re imperfect people, we’re not going to achieve perfection, but what we have to do is do the best we can with the tools we have,” Reynolds said. .

The JCP Policy Committee will meet next week to discuss the hiring process and other details. A finalized plan should be presented to the school board by the end of the month.